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StatsD: How to Measure Anything in Your System

Editor’s note: This post was originally written for the Scalyr blog. You can check out the original here.


In his book “How to Measure Anything,” management consultant and author Douglas Hubbard states that “anything can be measured.” Hubbard argues that something that can be observed lends itself to being measured.

How can this apply to software development and operations? Well, in today’s world of increasingly complex IT systems, you can’t afford not to measure anything and everything. But in order to observe and then measure something, it needs to meet the literal definition of observability, meaning that a system’s internal state must be exposed externally. This allows you to measure it. With observability, you find out not only that your system malfunctioned, but also why. This is done with data from logs, metrics, and traces.

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Understanding XenDesktop Login Performance

Editor’s note: This post was originally written for the Blue Medora blog. You can check out the original here.


For most of us, logging in is a daily routine. We log into everything from personal games like Fortnite to work websites. But before we get to those steps, we often first have to log into one more thing: our desktop.

It used to be that to get to your desktop, you had to be sitting in front of it. But with the help of application and desktop virtualization solutions from vendors like Citrix, we’ve long since said goodbye to those requirements. For almost 20 years, I’ve recommended deploying Citrix to application owners wanting to give users remote access to their desktops and applications.

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Application Performance Monitoring vs. Observability Silo

Editor’s note: This post was originally written for the The New Stack. You can check out the original here.


The most important ability is availability.

This is a common statement I hear from sports commentators. Whether athletes are in the NBA, NFL or EPL, they need to be available to play the game before anyone can talk about how good they are at scoring points or goals. Someone just cannot become a great player if they’re always on the bench because of an injury.

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Questions to ask your APM provider before you buy

Editor’s note: This post was originally written for the Raygun blog. You can check out the original here.


APM is something that some organizations either don’t fully understand or don’t put much thought into until it’s too late. When there’s a problem with an application, the organization scrambles to find a tool that can help solve the problem at hand. They contact the sales teams of various APM vendors to see which ones can help them.

But remember that the sales team’s job is to do their ABCs and “always be closing.” And they do a good job of it because I’ve come across many organizations over the years that have purchased an APM product but don’t have a clear understanding of what it’s doing for them or how it’s doing it.

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(Correctly) Sizing Infrastructure When Migrating a Database

Editor’s note: This post was originally written for the Blue Medora blog. You can check out the original here.


One-size-fits-all doesn’t work. When it comes to IT infrastructure, it’s one-size-fits-none.

Whether on-premise or in the cloud, data centers are complicated, and no two are alike. As your organization’s needs change, your data center infrastructure size should change with it.

One of those changes that force you to reconsider your infrastructure is when you migrate your database. Don’t expect your infrastructure to successfully support a complete database migration without any changes to its size.

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4 Reasons Why Small & Medium Businesses Need Application Testing (Part 4): It Could Be You

In part 3, I talked about how having an application being susceptible to intermittent issues is another reason why small and medium businesses need application testing. In you haven’t read it, go here.

In this post, I talk about reason #4.

In part 2, I mentioned that the customer was using NAT to separate its network from the SaaS provider’s network. That’s not uncommon. Every company wants to help protect its network from anything malicious from another network. Nothing new there.

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4 Reasons Why Small & Medium Businesses Need Application Testing (Part 3): Performance Problems Are Sporadic

In part 2, I talked about how having an application that has multiple tiers is another reason why small and medium businesses need application testing. In you haven’t read it, go here.

In this post, I talk about reason #3.

When I was brought on to help resolve this application issue and started asking my questions, I found out that the issues the users were having occurred intermittently. Once I hear “intermittent”, I know I will need to do some continuous captures.

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4 Reasons Why Small & Medium Businesses Need Application Testing (Part 2): There Are Multiple Tiers

In the previous post, I talked about how having an application that was originally designed for the LAN is one reason why small and medium businesses need application testing. In you haven’t read it, go here.

In this post, I talk about reason #2.

So not only was this application also designed for users being local to the server, it was also deployed in a complex architecture of multiple tiers.

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